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George Washington

Author: George Washington Country: United States
Birth Date: 1732-02-22 Death Date: 1799-12-14
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Quotes:


"There is no saying to what length an enterprising man may push his good fortune."

Source: To the New York Council of Safety, August 4, 1777
Topic: Ambition Quotes
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"I am so hackneyed to the touches of the painter's pencils that I am now altogether at their beck...at first I was as impatient and as restive under the operation as a colt is of the saddle. The next time I submitted very reluctantly, but with less flouncing. Now no dray horse moves more readily to his thill than I do to the painter's chair."

Source: A letter to Francis Hopkinson, 1785
Topic: Arts Quotes
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"Men who are familiarized to danger, meet it without shrinking, whereas those who have never seen service often apprehend danger where no danger lies."

Source: A letter to the Continental Congress, February 9, 1776
Topic: Bravery/Courage Quotes
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"...[I]t would be peculiarly improper to omit in this first official act my fervent supplications to that Almighty Being who rules over the universe, who presides in the councils of nations, and whose providential aids can supply every human defect, that His benediction may consecrate to the liberties and happiness of the people of the United States a Government instituted by themselves for these essential purposes, and may enable every instrument employed in its administration to execute with success the functions allotted to his charge. In tendering this homage to the Great Author of every public and private good, I assure myself that it expresses your sentiments not less than my own, nor those of my fellow-citizens at large less than either. No people can be bound to acknowledge and adore the invisible hand, which conducts the affairs of men more than the People of the United States. Every step, by which they have advanced to the character of an independent nation, seems to have been distinguished by some token of providential agency, and in the important revolution just accomplished in the system of their united government the tranquil deliberations and voluntary consent of so many distinct communities from which the event has resulted can not be compared with the means by which most governments have been established without some return of pious gratitude, along with an humble anticipation of the future blessings which the past seem to presage.

Source: First Inaugural Address of George Washington (New York city) Thursday, April 30, 1789
Topic: Providence Quotes
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